Brody Neighborhood

Brody Neighborhood

Experience one of MSU’s largest and most eco-friendly student neighborhoods, Brody.

Brody neighborhood is the most recently renovated neighborhood on campus, with a wealth of resources and amenities — including the largest dining hall on campus! There are a ton of food options to choose from and MSU students come from all over to dine here. 

Brody has community style living with free laundry facilities for residents in every building. It’s also home to the Brody neighborhood engagement center, which is a resource for students in every neighborhood on campus. This is where you’ll find a health clinic, career services, tutoring, intercultural assistance and more. 

Many first-year students choose to live in this neighborhood because the residents are very involved and participate in many Spartan traditions. Plus, Brody is modern and has many eco-friendly choices, including recycling options in all halls. Emmons and Butterfield halls are also Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) certified, meaning they save money and resources and promote clean, renewable energy, all while having a positive impact on the health of occupants. 

Engagement centers

Engagement centers are located in each neighborhood and serve as the main access points to important resources such as advisers, tutors, health practitioners and other resources that can help you navigate through your college career.

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Pentecost Plaza

Pentecost Plaza

Visit the historic sports field and MSU’s oldest athletic facility, the Pentecost Plaza at Old College Field.

The Pentecost Plaza at Old College Field serves as the entrance to the McLane Baseball Stadium, the Secchia Softball Stadium and the DeMartin Soccer Stadium. All fields offer free student admission. 

This is the oldest athletic facility on campus that is still in continuous use. It was purchased in 1900 as the home of Spartan baseball, MSU’s first varsity sport. In addition, DeMartin stadium was one of the first soccer facilities in the Midwest. 

The Pentecost Foundation was established in 2002. It was named in honor of Joe D. Pentecost, an entrepreneur and real estate developer who was an MSU season-ticket holder and donor for more than 35 years. 

This location is rich in historical significance. In fact, it was approved as a historical marker to celebrate 125 years of intercollegiate athletics. 

Old College Field

The Pentecost Plaza at Old College Field serves as the entrance to the McLane Baseball Stadium, the Secchia Softball Stadium and the DeMartin Soccer Stadium.

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Munn Ice Arena

Munn Ice Arena

Check out the home of MSU hockey, the Munn Ice Arena.

The Munn Ice Arena is the home of Michigan State Spartan Hockey. It was built in 1974 as a hockey-only facility. Since then, it’s undergone renovations several times to keep improving facilities and give student athletes and hockey fans the best possible experience. This includes a complete replacement of the ice making equipment, updating the arena seating and ensuring ADA compliance, and adding private luxury boxes.

The ice arena seats almost 6,500 fans. If you’re coming to a game as a student, you’ll probably be sitting in the student section, called the Munnsters.

A training room, weight room, equipment room and player’s lounge are all located alongside the Spartan Hockey locker room. Open hockey practice is available and, during specific times, public skating and open figure skating are offered, too. 

Plus, the building is the site of the largest planting project on campus. In fact, the surrounding area serves as a teaching and demonstration area for landscape architecture, botany and horticulture students. The pines outside of Munn are also steeped in history and tradition. If you’ve ever heard the “MSU Alma Mater Shadows” song, these are the pines mentioned in those lyrics!

“Beneath the pines we’ll gather”

The pines outside of Munn are mentioned in the “MSU Alma Mater Shadows” song. 

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Engineering Building

Engineering Building

If you’re interested in studying engineering, make sure to check out the Engineering Building.

The Engineering Building is the home of Spartan Engineers, who explore and learn the main fields of engineering in diversified classes and labs. There are a variety of tutoring and mentoring opportunities to assist students in targeted courses.

The College of Engineering has a well-organized pathway to introduce you to MSU, guide and nurture your academic journey and then give you the career advice and networks you’ll need to land competitive internships and jobs.

Incoming freshmen who are interested in an engineering major should check out the CoRe experience, a supportive program that helps ensure the success of engineering majors. Housed in South Neighborhood, CoRe brings real-world expertise and challenges into the classroom and residential environment, showing how important engineering is for solving global challenges.

Design day

The College of Engineering hosts Design Day every year for students to explore different companies and present designs made in classes.

An MSU engineering student presents during design day

Photo Gallery

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Minskoff Pavilion

Minskoff Pavilion

Check out the breathtaking state-of-the-art business school facility, the Minskoff Pavilion.

The Edward J. Minskoff Pavilion is a state-of-the-art facility for the MSU Broad College of Business, covering 100,000 square feet. Alumnus and real estate developer Edward J. Minskoff donated $30 million — the largest single gift from an individual in MSU’s history — to create innovative learning and career development spaces for business students. The Pavilion was completed in July of 2019. 

The Pavilion enhances the Broad student experience through its design around community, collaboration and teamwork. Higher education as we know it is changing, and this super-modern facility puts Broad College ahead of the curve with flexible classrooms, energy-efficient spaces and cutting-edge technology

This is also the place to find the only Panera on campus!

360 virtual tour

Wander the halls of the
Edward J. Minskoff Pavilion with Sparty on this virtual tour that explores the many spaces within the building. 

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Spartan Statue

Spartan Statue

Visit the star of many photos and MSU traditions, the Spartan Statue.

The Spartan Statue stands at 9 feet, 7 inches of bronze metal and is the star of many photos and MSU traditions — including the Walk to the Stadium by the football team two hours before kick-off on game days. Another fun tradition is “Sparty Watch,” when the Spartan Marching Band protects the statue before MSU plays the University of Michigan.

Students consider it a bucket list item to get a picture with Sparty, both the statue and mascot, before they graduate. This statue is actually a replica of the original terra cotta Spartan Statue, which now lives in the tower of Spartan Stadium to better survive Michigan winters. 

The original statue was erected almost twenty years after the MSU community became known as the Spartans. Before, the students of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU) went by the name of the Aggies, but when the college changed names to the Michigan State College of Agriculture and Applied Science, both faculty and students felt it was time for a change.

Spartan spirit

President John Hannah presents his speech, “The Spartan,” at the statue’s unveiling ceremony. To Hannah, the Spartan statue was a symbol of the strength, honor and courageousness that represents the spirit of MSU’s students.

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MSU Union

MSU Union 

If you want tasty food, Spartan swag or to see the student activities hotspot, visit the MSU Union.

The MSU Union is home to the University Activities Board (UAB), which hosts a variety of concerts, open mic nights, craft nights and much more for students during the school year. You’ll also find a food court, the Spartan Spirit Shop, study lounges and computer centers here.

This building was originally called the Memorial Student Union and officially opened in June 1925 as a memorial to American soldiers. Teams of students, faculty, alumni and other college supporters dug the basement by hand. 

The MSU Union is a lifestyle center where students meet and have fun. You can grab a drink, a snack, a meal or a souvenir. You can study, visit the North Neighborhood Engagement Center or just relax and use the Wi-Fi anywhere in the building. There is always something going on! 

Digging the foundation

Volunteers digging the foundation for the MSU Union in November 1923. The text on the front reads: M.A.C Men work on Union Building Nov. 1923.

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MSU Library

MSU Library

Explore the amazing collections and technology at the MSU Library. 

The main library is a vital partner in teaching, learning, research and engagement at Michigan State University. Students, faculty and MSU library staff collaborate and use cutting-edge technology to navigate an increasingly complex information landscape. 

The library is open 24 hours most days, and open 24/7 during finals weeks. There are two sides: the east, which is dedicated to quiet study, and the west, which is dedicated to group and social study. The MSU copy center also offers print services — including 3D printers — book binders and copiers. 

Also, it is the home of the largest and rarest public comic book collection in the world!

The MSU library is the place where Spartans do research to solve the world’s most complex problems. The library reaches out to MSU communities, to teach from its collections and resources, and to learn from community stories. And when it’s time for a study break, there’s a café inside the library with tasty snacks and beverages. 

Digital scholarship lab

MSU is the first library in the country to have a digital scholarship lab that includes a virtual reality and 360-degree immersive visualization space.

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Student Services

Student Services

If you’re looking for the main resource center for student life, visit Student Services.

The Student Services building is the central location for many student resources on campus, including Career Services Network, the Student Life office, ASMSU (student government), Financial Aid, legal services, and counseling and therapy services. This is also the home of the resource centers for student veterans and LGBTQ+ students. 

In addition, MSU has more than 900 registered student organizations and over 60 fraternities and sororities — so students have no problem finding a group of people with their shared passions and interests! Those interested in the student organizations should stop by the Student Life office. 

The Career Services Network is one of the most powerful resources for preparing you for life after college. They offer resume help, mock interviews and career counseling. The network also hosts career fairs and connects students with Spartan alumni for mentorship opportunities.

Career Services

Career Services offices are located here and offer resume help, career counseling and more to students living both on and off campus.

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The Rock

The Rock

Visit the Rock, one of MSU’s most legendary campus icons.

The Rock is the oldest MSU icon with the most colorful history — in more ways than one. Functioning as a hand-painted billboard for students by students throughout the decades, the Rock was actually a class gift from the MSU Class of 1873.

It wasn’t a billboard in the beginning, though — in fact, during the 1940s and 1950s, the Rock was known as the “Engagement Rock,” where marriage proposals would take place. However, once the 1960s and 1970s came around, the Rock became a political platform and billboard for various groups. 

Today, the Rock is painted with a new message almost every day by students and student organizations — promoting events and groups, proclaiming love and support, memorializing someone, etc. The unwritten rule about painting the Rock is that whoever is there first at night to paint it can do so; however, if the painters decide not to stay and guard the Rock, any other group can come and repaint it. 

While the Rock might not be as prestigious or grand as other MSU campus icons, it is truly an evolving monument that represents the needs, time and spirit of the students at MSU. 

A campus icon

The Rock is a gift from the Class of 1873.

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